Timon of Athens

by William Shakespeare


Timon of Athens (The Life of Tymon of Athens) is a play written by William Shakespeare and probably also Thomas Middleton in about 1606. It was published in the First Folio in 1623. Timon lavishes his wealth on parasitic companions until he is poor and rejected by them. He rejects mankind and goes to live in a cave. 
The earliest-known production of the play was in 1674, when Thomas Shadwell wrote an adaptation under the title The History of Timon of Athens, The Man-hater. Multiple other adaptations followed over the next century, by writers such as Thomas Hull, James Love and Richard Cumberland. The straight Shakespearean text was performed at Smock Alley in Dublin in 1761, but adaptations continued to dominate the stage until well into the 20th century.
Timon of Athens was originally grouped with the tragedies, but some scholars name it one of the problem plays.
Excerpted from Timon of Athens on Wikipedia.

person AuthorWilliam Shakespeare
language CountryEngland
api GenreTragedy, Drama
copyright CopyrightPublic domain worldwide.
camera_alt Book coverDrawing by Johann Heinrich Ramberg of Timon and the gold
Image: wikimedia
book_online EbooksProject Gutenberg
description ScansGoogle-digitized
headphones AudioThanks to Librivox | Internet Archive:
Reader: Group, Dramatic Readings
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auto_stories Read onlineHTML version