Uncle Tom's Cabin

by Harriet Beecher Stowe


Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in two volumes in 1852, the novel had a profound effect on attitudes toward African Americans and slavery in the U.S., and is said to have "helped lay the groundwork for the [American] Civil War".
Stowe, a Connecticut-born woman of English descent, was part of the religious Beecher family and an active abolitionist. She wrote the sentimental novel to depict the reality of slavery while also asserting that Christian love could overcome slavery. The novel focuses on the character of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave around whom the stories of the other characters revolve. 
Uncle Tom's Cabin was the best-selling novel and the second best-selling book of the 19th century, following the Bible, and is credited with helping fuel the abolitionist cause in the 1850s. The impact attributed to the book was so great that a likely apocryphal story arose of Abraham Lincoln meeting Stowe at the start of the Civil War and declaring, "So this is the little lady who started this great war."
Excerpted from Uncle Tom's Cabin on Wikipedia.

person AuthorHarriet Beecher Stowe
language CountryUnited States
api GenreSlaveryPolitical fictionPsychological fictionDidactic fiction
copyright CopyrightPublic domain worldwide.
camera_alt Book cover"Uncle Tom and Little Eva"
Original Image: Edwin Long|wikipedia
book_online EbooksProject Gutenberg
description ScansGoogle-digitized
headphones AudioThanks to Librivox | Internet Archive:
Reader: John Greenman
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