Following The Equator
A Journey Around The World

by Mark Twain


Following the Equator (sometimes titled More Tramps Abroad) is a non-fiction social commentary in the form of a travelogue published by Mark Twain in 1897. Twain was practically bankrupt in 1894 due to investing heavily into the failed Paige Compositor. In an attempt to extricate himself from debt of $100,000 (equivalent of about $2,975,000 in 2020) he undertook a tour of the British Empire in 1895 at age 60, a route chosen to provide numerous opportunities for lectures in English. 
Throughout the novel, Twain uses the opportunity of visiting the various locations on his tour to espouse "perceptive descriptions and discussions of people, climate, flora and fauna, indigenous cultures, religion, customs, politics, food, and many other topics". The novel contains a significant amount of social commentary, although much of it is done in a satirical manner. 
Although this social commentary is the great import of the book, it is notable that Twain also included a number of fictional stories in the body of what is otherwise a non-fiction work. 
Excerpted from Following the Equator on Wikipedia.

The Complete Travel Books of Mark Twain:
The Innocents Abroad (1869), Roughing It (1872), Old Times on the Mississippi (1876), A Tramp Abroad (1880), Life on the Mississippi (1883), Following the Equator (1897)


person AuthorMark Twain
language CountryUnited States
api GenreTravelogue, Social life
copyright CopyrightPublic domain worldwide.
camera_alt Book coverThanks to Canva
book_online EbooksProject Gutenberg
description ScansGoogle-digitized
headphones AudioLibrivox | Internet Archive
Reader: John Greenman
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auto_stories Read onlineFollowing The Equator I, II