Thus Spake Zarathustra

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Translated by Thomas Common


Thus Spake Zarathustra: A Book for All and None, also translated as Thus Spake Zarathustra, is a work of philosophical fiction written by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche between 1883 and 1885. The protagonist is nominally the historical Zoroaster, but, besides a handful of sentences, Nietzsche is not concerned with a specific resemblance. Much of the book consists of discourses by Zarathustra on a wide variety of subjects, most of which end with the refrain, "Thus spoke Zarathustra." The character of Zarathustra first appeared in Nietzsche's earlier book The Gay Science. 
The style of Zarathustra has facilitated varied and often incompatible ideas about what Zarathustra says. Zarathustra's "explanations and claims are almost always analogical and figurative." Though there is no consensus with what Zarathustra means when he speaks, there is some consensus about that which he speaks. Zarathustra deals with ideas about the Ubermensch, the death of God, the will to power, and eternal recurrence. 
Nietzsche has suggested that his Zarathustra is a tragedy, a parody, a polemic, and the culmination of the German language. It was his favorite of his own books. He was aware, however, that readers might not understand it. This is possibly why he subtitled it A Book for All and None. However, as with the content as a whole, the subtitle has baffled many critics, and there is no consensus. 
Zarathustra's themes and merits are continually disputed. It has nonetheless been hugely influential in various facets of culture.
Excerpted from Thus Spoke Zarathustra on Wikipedia.

person AuthorFriedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
language CountryGermany
api GenrePhilosophy
copyright CopyrightPublic domain worldwide.
camera_alt Book coverBuch Also sprach Zarathustra
Image: Hlamo | wikipedia
book_online EbooksProject Gutenberg
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